A fifth of vertebrates in the world are in danger of extinction due to the invasion of their territories and the effects of agriculture on them, advirito the first week of November, a Studio world.The number of species under threat of extinction is rising, according to the scientists, but conservation efforts are helping to reduce the global rate of extinction of species. The backbone of biodiversity is deteriorating, said Edward O. Wilson, Professor and ecologist at Harvard University. A small step on the red list is a big step forward toward extinction. This is only a small window on the global losses that are currently taking place.

Scientists released the study, known as the red list, at the Summit of the biological diversity of the United Nations in Nagoya, Japan, where will have been carrying out, the last days, talks on the protection of the environment. The study, which also It will be published in the journal Science, found that at least 41 percent of amphibians are closer to extinction than other species, they are the most threatened animals. 13% Of birds tambien satisfy all the requirements to be on the list. The scientists used data from 25,000 species to study the world of mammals, birds, amphibians, reptiles and fish, taking into account that tambin there are many species of plants on the verge of disappearance. On average, 50 species of mammals, birds and amphibians are closer to extinction each year due to the impacts of agricultural expansion, logging, over-exploitation and invasive alien species, he is announced on the red list. The study highlighted 64 mammals, birds and amphibians whose situation has improved, including three species that were once considered extinct and made a comeback in number in the midst of major conservation efforts. They are the California condor and the black ferret in the United States, and the Mongolia native Przewalski horse.

Southeast Asia was the largest number of losses because of the rapid expansion of palm oil farms, timber operations and crops of rice, according to the study. A deadly fungus which affects amphibians contributed to losses in some parts of Central America, the tropical Andes of South America and Australia. Eeta diversity report confirms other reports of continued losses in biodiversity. However, scientists say that it is hardly the first test of the effects of the worldwide conservation efforts. The results show that the State of biodiversity has been reduced by almost 20%, something that never would have happened without the conservation actions taken, the report says.